Director of the Bard MBA in Sustainability to Speak at UCF: The World Needs You, and You Need a Job

 Careers in Green Business and Environmental Policy

Director, Bard MBA in Sustainability & Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy

Bard College

 Goodstein

Dr. Goodstein will discuss how to make a living saving the planet, with a focus on jobs “changing the rules” (in environmental policy) and jobs “playing the game” (building financially viable businesses that solve social and environmental problems).

WHERE: CLASSROOM BUILDING 1 ROOM 219

WHEN: MARCH 21, 10 AM

PDF flier: Goodstein talk

Sponsored by the Political Ecology Lab@ UCF, the Department of Political Science, and the Interdisciplinary Studies Program

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Senior Lab Associate, Charlene Kormondy, Earns top UCF Award

Today, Senior Research Associate Charlene Kormondy, was notified that she had earned UCF’s most prestigious award, the Order of the Pegasus.

This is a very competitive award that requires exceptional scholarship and engagement, and is granted only to those who– after extensive vetting, demonstrate “exemplary performance by UCF bachelor’s degree students in the areas of academic achievement, outstanding university involvement, leadership, and community service.”

charlenephoto

 

Congratulations Charlene!

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Dr. Jacques to Speak at the Wilson Center for International Scholars

Talking Science: Environmental and Health Communications in a Skeptical Era

On November 22, 2013, Dr. Jacques will join several other scholars to discuss science in a skeptical world.  Interested individuals can watch the streamed recording here:

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/talking-science-environmental-and-health-communications-skeptical-era

Here is the program:

How can communications professionals, policymakers, and academic experts effectively communicate environmental and health issues in a skeptical era? In the first of two panels, communications directors from US and UN agencies and environmental and health NGOs will discuss the relationships and negotiations that underlie action (or inaction) in a major policy-making capital like Washington, D.C. In the second panel, five speakers will explore the cultural and social causes and consequences of climate change skepticism (especially American climate change skepticism) and consider the implications for national and international efforts to address global climate change. This two-part discussion is sponsored by the Environmental Communication Division of the National Communication Association. A detailed agenda of the afternoon is available in the “Event Documents” section.

RELATED CONTENT:

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly tokatharine.diamond@wilsoncenter.orgMedia bringing heavy electronics MUST indicate this in their response so they may be cleared through our building security and allowed entrance. Please err toward responding if you would like to attend.

LOCATION:
6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Event Speakers List:
  • Director of Health Communications, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Senior Technical Advisor for External Affairs, Office of Population and Reproductive Health, USAID
  • Director of Communications, Population Action International
  • Associate Director of Communications, Natural Resources Defense Council
  • Meaghan Parker // Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program
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Gallery

“An Assessment of Climate Change Politics: Discourse and Division” | Climate-Sustainability Lecture Series

This gallery contains 1 photos.

Dr. Peter Jacques, Director of the Political Ecology Lab at UCF, will present a talk at Nova Southeastern in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Friday September 20th in noon at the Mailman-Hollywood Building. ClimateLecture_09-20 Nova Southeastern

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Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media essay

Image of books by year

Professor Riley E. Dunlap and PE Lab Director, Peter J. Jacques, were commissioned to convey the findings of their research on climate denial books originally published in American Behavioral Scientist in the Spring of 2013 now available for open access here: http://abs.sagepub.com/content/57/6/699

Currently this article is listed by ABS as the most read article of the journal. The Yale Forum essay highlighted the trends in climate denial books and the fact that they usually are not peer reviewed, allowing for “zombie arguments” that, no matter how many times are shown to be untrue, continue to rise from the dead.

Image of books

 

You can read the blog here: http://bit.ly/ZLT5vh

 

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Political Ecology Lab Student Addresses UNESCO on Climate Adaptation and Sustainability

 

Charlene Kormondy, a member of the Political Ecology Lab at UCF, traveled to Nevis in the West Indies this summer as a delegate at the UNESCO Conference on Environmental Policy Formulation and Planning in the Caribbean Region to present her work on sustainable agriculture. She participated in the President’s Scholars study abroad program last summer through the international partnership between the University of Central Florida and Clarence Fitzroy Bryant College (CFBC) in St. Kitts. At the conference, she presented on her experiences building a shadehouse on the CFBC campus last summer, explaining how sustainable farming inside of a shadehouse can improve gender equity and help solve problems that result from the negative impacts of climate change. She participated in a panel discussion at the conference with other representatives from CFBC and UCF to show international leaders an example of an adaptation strategy that can be implemented to help small island nations in the face of climate change impacts.

 

UNESCO_Kormondy

Charlene  is pictured here left to right Dr. Leighton Naraine (Conference Chair), Jessica Gottsleben (UCF Student), Charlene Kormondy, Dr. Kevin Meehan (UCF Professor of English).

Her work was covered by the news media here:

http://www.winnfm.com/news/local/4151-students-lecturer-show-benefits-of-technology-in-agriculture

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Lab Member Wins Presidential Leadership Position at UCF

charlenephoto

 

Charlene Kormondy, an undergraduate member of the Political Ecology Lab in the UCF Political Science department and an Interdisciplinary Studies major has been accepted as part of the UCF Presidential Leadership Council.

President John Hitt, writes that, “These students have been selected for their excellence in leadership, scholarship, and service to the university and the Orlando community. Chosen by a committee of faculty, staff, and students, the members of the council serve as ambassadors for the university and for my office.

The President’s Leadership Council has proven to be a valuable asset to our institution and community. It has assumed responsibility for hosting university functions and touring distinguished guests of the university, and its members are also very active in the recruitment of new students. The accomplishments of the PLC members, as well as their commitment, energy, and positive attitudes about UCF and its development, are truly distinctive.

The biographical sketches included on this website provide information on the activities, honors, UCF experiences, and community involvement of the individual PLC members. This information should be very helpful if you need a student host or representative for your department, organization, or project. I commend the PLC for the excellent service its members render to the university.”

The website describing the PLC notes that “The council members of PLC serve UCF as official student ambassadors at all times and at special events such as Commencements, Board of Trustees’ meetings, Board of Governors’ meetings and Gubernatorial visits. PLC members are expected to establish a tradition of leadership for students at UCF. Members of the council are expected to maintain a commitment to personal and professional development and to act with professionalism while carrying out their duties. In return, the PLC receive experience and training in leadership, administration, and public relations as a result of their interaction with campus and community leaders.”

See the announcement here.

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Professor Riley Dunlap Speaks to the Political Ecology Lab @ UCF

TPE @UCF had the fine honor of hosting Professor Riley Dunlap, who provided a seminar to the lab on the origin of environmental sociology.  We heard about the process of research, collaboration, and the importance of thinking about the bigger picture. Prof. Dunlap explained the history and back story to several important ideas like the Dominant Social Paradigm, the Human Exemptionalist Paradigm (and why it is not the human “exceptionalist” paradigm), and the New Environmental Paradigm, not to mention environmental and climate skepticism issues.

Riley speaks the UCF  Political Ecology Laba

Students were able to talk in an intimate setting with one of the more important figures of environmental sociology and he was able to discuss the humble origins of a few great ideas and research findings that would stand the test of decades.  The lab enjoyed dinner to follow where the students discussed their own research projects with Professor Dunlap.

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The Vast Majority of Titles that Reject Orthodox Climate Science are not Peer-Reviewed

In a paper authored by Riley Dunlap and Peter Jacques with help from the Political Ecology Lab at UCF, “Climate Change Denial Books and Conservative Think Tanks: Exploring the Connection” was just published in the online first edition of American Behavioral Scientist.

This research took years of detailed analysis which involved reading and coding every English-language book that rejected orthodox climate change science (108 here, though it is possible we missed some– but we think we have the vast majority). We find that 10 percent of the climate denial books, at best, get some kind of peer-review.  Those that were published through dedicated science presses are assumed to have gone through peer-review of some kind (what kind is unclear since private for-profit presses do not reveal their process).  Not one first edition denial book is from a university press, and starting in 2007 the number of self-published titles rose sharply. We take this to mean that the counter-movement of climate denial has diffused from an elite-led to a more popular movement.  You can find the paper at American Behavioral Scientist

The article has been covered in the Columbia Journalism Review here and here.

 

 

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What the Obamacare ruling may portend for energy and climate policy.

An insightful comment from our friend, Skip Laitner:

What the Obamacare ruling may portend for energy and climate policy – and for our next steps ahead

This fits with a thesis we are following here at the lab: social change is limited by social paradigms that create meta-law (laws that create other laws, like the US Constitution).  Meta-laws guide and provide the boundary conditions for new detail-level laws.  These laws, however, if they are not consistent with the organizing paradigm, will come in conflict with the meta-law.

The US paradigm is based on liberal individualism, where private property is paramount; the Constitution limits federal regulation to inter-state commerce — thus economic conditions that speak to our paradigm.  Currently everything from the Civil Rights Act to the Clean Water Act have authority through inter-state commerce, but are essentially not about commerce.  Inasmuch as they are not about commerce, they are not consistent with the larger demands of the paradigm and the meta-law, and will be open to weakening and perhaps elimination because we have limited constitutional authority to the federal government on what the actual purview of the federal government can be– can it be in support of civil rights? clean water? Only to the extent that these issues affect commerce between the states, and thus we are doing work here that will be presented at academic fora that propose this model of:

Paradigm–>Metalaw–> Governance

As the basic limits to social change– if we want to govern beyond commerce, we need a new paradigm that will build reformed or new metalaw; conversely, if we want to keep things as they are in the US at least, we will have weak opportunities for the federal government to make good on a larger social contract.

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